Happy Christmas, and the answers

I had more entries than ever this year. Quite a few got the answers all right, but a few struggled so I’ll put you out of your misery.

The answers are:

White is the colour of Christmas that I’m dreaming of, as sung by Bing Crosby (and quite a few others since!). I told you it was an easy start.

Someone special is who I’ll give my heart to this year, unlike Last Christmas as Wham! sang about.

Your Granny is up and rock and rolling with the rest, according to Slade in Merry Christmas Everybody! It’s CHRIIIIIIIIIIISTMAS!

The Christmas party hop is where we’ll be rocking around the Christmas tree thanks to Brenda Lee.

The boys of the NYPD choir were singing ‘Galway Bay’ as we heard in the brilliant Fairytale of New York by The Pogues and the much missed Kirsty Macholl.

Blue is the colour that my Christmas will be without you – or more accurately it’s the colour Elvis’ Christmas would have been without you.

He began to dance around. This one caught out a lot of people, who obviously aren’t fans of Frosty the Snowman.

Thank God it’s them instead of you, which Bono sang on the original BandAid.

I saw Mommy kissing Santa Clause underneath the mistletoe last night.

Santa Clause is coming to town, which is why you’d better watch out (and better not cry etc).

I hope this gave you a little bit of fun, and well done to those of you who got them all right.

Thank you to everyone who entered. There is a donation of £200 on its way to SOFII as you read this. And especially well done to Kat from the University of Southampton, who was the first with 10/10 out of the hat who will get £50 to donate to any charity she chooses.

All that’s left is to wish you all a very happy Christmas and new year and a successful and healthy 2017.

Roger

Merry Christmas

It’s nearly here, so I want to wish you a very Happy Christmas.

My Christmas Quiz is back. And it’s testing how well you know your Christmas lyrics. How many of the ten questions on the card can you answer?

Click here to see it in a larger format.

Happy Christmas!

Just send me your answers. For every entry I receive (right or wrong) I will give £2 to SOFII*, and at 5pm on Thursday 22nd December I will draw one name from all those who get the most right answers and donate £50 to a charity of their choice.

Just email me (or use the Contact Me link) with your guesses.

Enjoy the quiz. And I wish you and your loved ones a very happy and peaceful Christmas and New Year.

Roger

P.S. If you want to know the answers I will post them before Christmas – be sure to sign up to make sure you get them.

* I have chosen SOFII again this year as they provide an invaluable resource to all us fundraisers. Our job is to inspire donors and SOFII makes this a little easier for all of us. Much as I love them, I need to limit my donation to them to £200, but please do enter to make sure we get there.

Christmas wishes and answers

Thank you to everyone who entered the Christmas quiz this year.

Firstly an apology. There were actually 13 bands / artists in there. No-one spotted my mistake, which meant that anyone who spotted 12 was entered into the draw (but more on that later). To put you out of your misery, the 13 were:

Danny Williams (no, not the Reading midfielder who scored a fantastic volley on Saturday!) who was no. 1 in 1961 with Moon River

Slade with the brilliant “Merry Christmas Everybody” in 1973

Mud, with “Lonely this Christmas” in 1974

Queen. “Bohemian Rhapsody” was no. 1 in 1975 and again in 1991 – the year Freddie Mercury died

The Beatles, who had four Christmas number ones… “I want to hold your hand” in 1963; “I feel fine” in 1964; “Day Tripper” / “We can work it out” in 1965 and “Hello, Goodbye” in 1967

Wings who were no. 1 in 1977 with “Mull of Kintyre” / “Girls’ School”

St Winifred’s School Choir (sorry for reminding you) with “There’s No One Quite Like Grandma” in 1980

Boney M who were no. 1 in 1978 with “Mary’s Boy Child – Oh My Lord”

Benny Hill with “Ernie (The Fastest Milkman in the West)” in 1971

East 17 who were no. 1 with “Stay Another Day” in 1994

Cliff Richard, who was no. 1 with “Mistletoe and Wine” in 1988 and with “Saviour’s Day” in 1990

Band Aid who were no. 1 in 1984 with “Do they know it’s Christmas”…

… which kept our 12th, “Last Christmas” by Wham!, off the top spot.

Well done to those who got all 12. And apologies if there is a bias towards older records – I guess I’m showing my age!

Thank you to everyone who entered. There is a donation of £200 on its way to SOFII as you read this. Especially well done to Phoebe from the Galapagos Conservation Trust who spotted 12 and was the first out of the hat. She gets £50 to donate to any charity she chooses.

Have a happy Christmas everyone, and here’s hoping your 2016 is fun, successful and healthy.

Roger

Happy Christmas, and my Christmas Quiz

2015 has been quite a year for UK fundraisers, and as it draws to a close I hope you are all looking forward to a very Happy Christmas.

As you know, every year I run a Christmas quiz, raising money for SOFII. This year it’s a word-search – what could be simpler? Simply look in the tree below and find as many of the bands and artists that have had a UK Christmas no 1 hit (they might be written forwards, backwards, up, down or diagonally). There are 11 in total, plus another band that would have had one but for BandAid (there’s a clue!).

Can you spot the 12 bands and artists?

Can you spot the 12 bands and artists?

For every entry I receive I will donate £1 to SOFII*. And at midday on Christmas Eve, I will draw, at random, one entry from those that have got them all right and they will win a £50 donation for the charity of their choice.

Just email Christmas@RogerLawsonConsulting.com with your guesses.

I hope you enjoy the challenge – good luck! And please do pass this on to colleagues and friends to increase their chances of winning too.

With very best wishes for Christmas and for 2016.

Roger

PS For those of you that don’t get all 12, I will blog the answers on Christmas Eve.

* Why SOFII? Because at these times when we all need to be more creative in the way we inspire donors, it provides the most fantastic resource. For free!

Happy Christmas… The answers

It’s nearly Christmas, and the draw has been made.

Congratulations to George Overton of the Pilgrimage Trust who was the first all correct entry out of the hat. He wins £50 for his favourite charity. And thanks also to all the other entries – £200 is on it’s way to SOFII.

There were a lot more correct entries this year, but to put some of you out of your misery here are the answers. (From top and left to right):

Noel – there’s no L in there. Geddit? For those who guessed ‘Christmas Alphabet’ I can see where you were coming from, but it wasn’t quite the whole alphabet.

12 days of Christmas. Again, I liked a couple of entries that suggested ‘I Wish it Could be Christmas Everyday’ if only because it’s a great song!

I’m Dreaming of a White Christmas

All I want for Christmas is You

(Walking in a) Winter Wonderland

The First Noel

All that remains is to wish you all a very happy Christmas and a successful and healthy 2015. I’ll be planning next year’s quiz!

Roger

Happy Christmas

I hope 2014 has been successful and happy and that you are looking forward to 2015.

I’d like to wish you and yours a very happy Christmas and New Year.

You may know that every year I run a little Christmas Quiz with my Christmas card and best wishes. Apparently I made it a little difficult last year so I hope this year’s is a little easier. All you have to do is work out the clues which loosely lead to six Christmas songs.

Christmas card 2014

When you think you know the answers, email them to me. For every entry I will donate £1 to SOFII (because it is a brilliant resource for fundraisers – up to £200). In addition, on Christmas Eve I will draw one name out of a hat from those that get all six right and they will win £50 to donate to a charity of their choice. So please do pass this on to your colleagues and friends.

Enjoy the puzzle and good luck!

And make sure you’re signed up to this blog to be the first to have the answers delivered to your in-box in time for Christmas.

With very best wishes for a very merry Christmas and a happy and successful new year.

Roger

Loyalty driver 1: Personal connection (pt 2)

In the first part of this blog I wrote about how important increasing a donor’s loyalty is – the way they feel about your charity. This is the ultimate goal in relationship fundraising and to do it we need to know what drives loyalty. As a starting point I wrote about how important personal connection is to that.

That’s all well and good if you’re a university, a health related charity or a local cause. But what, I have been asked, can you do if you’re not one of these? Is it still relevant?

Yes!

Because your job is to create a connection between the donor and your cause or, better still, your organisation – an emotional link to give them a reason to believe that your charity is important to them personally.

Of course, you can’t just create a new cause, but can you present your work differently?

Can you make your appeal local?
Macmillan London appealRecently I received two appeals from national charities. Macmillan Cancer Support asked me to support their services in London. Now I don’t live in London, so I have to question their targeting, but if I did then they would have an appeal that is relevant for my family and my community – the people that I love.

Woodland Trust making it local to meAt a similar time the Woodland Trust proved they have better targeting by asking me to support the creation of a new Centenary Wood (to commemorate the centenary of the start of World War 1) just up the road from me. I enjoy walking outdoors, love woodland and (although they didn’t know this) earlier this year I visited the WW1 battle fields in The Somme and Ypres. For a national charity, I now have a local connection. And when I’ve visited the Centenary Wood (as I certainly will) I will have a personal experience.

Can you create a connection between the donor and the beneficiary?
I’ve talked before about the Baby Boxes for Bosnia campaign I ran for Feed the Children in the 1990’s. Besides being a brilliant ask, we gave people the chance to write a message of support – messages that we read.

Some of the most touching were from mums, writing to other mums that they’ll never meet or know. “I don’t know what it’s like to live in a war zone, but I do know what it’s like to have a young baby” started one mum on her message. This wasn’t just an international aid charity helping people in a far away country, she felt a personal connection to the mum receiving the box.

Be creative
Not everyone has the direct experience of ill-health, abuse or poverty (or whatever your cause is), but I’ve been involved in successful appeals asking farmers and teachers in the UK to give to farmers and teachers in Africa and medical professionals to provide medical kits for flying doctors.

Or maybe you need to create a product that links something we all do every day to your cause. I love the fact that I can twin my toilet with one in Burundi or Bangladesh.

It’s up to you. Don’t just give up and say my cause isn’t relevant. Think about your donors, your cause and your beneficiaries. Find what they have in common and get creative.

Your donors’ loyalty depends on it!